#NoticeMe Game Jam — Creator's Guide


#NoticeMe Game Jam — Creator's Guide

The #NoticeMe Game Jam is your chance to make your own game in 2 weeks. Win from a cash prize pool of $33,000 USD. and a chance to see your game featured in an arcade machine!

This Creator's Guide aims to explain the jam rules and give you the resources you need to make your best entry.

Check out our official tutorials to get started with GameMaker:

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Jam Rules

The game must incorporate the theme.

The theme, "Then The Night Changed Everything", must be used in your game in a way that is easily apparent. It may be reflected in your graphics, story, gameplay, or anything else you choose.

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The text you see above, and on the jam page, is only an example showing one of the ways that the theme can be interpreted. How you interpret and use the theme is entirely up to you!

For example, the theme for a previous jam we held was "UFO", and we got many great entries using that theme. Some were based on UFOs attacking, some were about controlling UFOs, and some had UFOs as part of the setting of their game.

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The game must be made using GameMaker Studio 2.

If you do not have GameMaker yet, download it for free and get started!


The game must be uploaded to GXC with the Game Jam tag.

Your entry must be uploaded to GXC before the jam is over. Follow the upload guide here to get your game published on GXC!

Watch this 1-minute tutorial to get your game up on GXC:


Need a longer, more detailed tutorial? We've got you covered:



After your upload, make sure to select "NoticeMe-Game-Jam" under "Event" on your Game Details page — this will mark your game as an entry to the jam.

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You only need to do this for your jam entry (or entries), not for your regular uploads.



The game should consider a simple control scheme, using around one to four buttons and direction inputs to play.

As arcade machines are the focus of this jam, your game must fit the controls usually found on arcades. This means there should be one directional input, and one to four buttons for actions.

"Directional input" includes input on the horizontal and vertical axes, which can be compared to the left stick on a gamepad. One to four buttons can be used for accompanying actions, such as jumping, attacking, pausing and more.

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One directional input and one to four buttons.


Collaborations and teams are welcome.

You are allowed to work in a team to make your jam entry, but of course, feel free to work alone! 💪


No racism, sexism, homophobia, or other forms of bullying. Nothing illegal.

This not only applies to your game's title, art, description, etc. but also to all of the content present in your game.


The game and all visual aspects should be made during the development period, however, you can use pre-made music, sound assets and fonts if you want.  


"The game and all visual aspects should be made during the development period"

The game program itself (i.e. its programming) and all of its visuals (i.e. sprites, animations, backgrounds) must have been created within the jam period.

This means that you cannot upload a game you programmed before the jam period, you cannot repurpose an old project for the jam and you cannot use graphics that were created before the jam started. That includes any graphics created by you or acquired from the internet (e.g. through GameMaker Bundles or third-party websites).

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"however, you can use pre-made music, sound assets and fonts if you want"

The previous rule does not apply to audio assets, since it's understandable that not every developer/team has the resources or time to create their own music and sound effects.

This means you are allowed to use music tracks and sound effects created by someone else or created before the jam period, as long as you have the rights to use them.

Of course, feel free to pick up that guitar and create some nice tunes for your players!


Fan games and games using licensed characters won't be accepted as game jam entries

You cannot infringe on someone else's intellectual property to create your jam entry. This means that all the content in your entry must be owned by you, or you must have the rights to use such content for publishing your own game.

For example, you cannot create a Mario fangame, or even have Mario be an in-game character, as it is owned by Nintendo. Derivative work can also easily infringe on someone's copyright, e.g. changing Mario's clothes to a yellow color will not hide that it's not original work.

Person thinks using Mario assets is good
It really doesn't.

More Resources

Visual Scripting (DnD): Hero's TrailA written tutorial series that uses Drag And Drop, our visual scripting system. You start with a basic sandbox project and implemented various lessons to program your own fully-fledged action-adventure game.
Visual Scripting (DnD): Fire JumpA video + written tutorial series that also uses Drag And Drop. You create an infinite scrolling platformer with highscores and GUI animations, all from scratch.
Powerful Coding (GML): Little TownA video tutorial series that takes you through making a simple game from scratch
Official Tech Blogs for Tips & TricksRead our official tech blogs to learn about the many things you can do in GameMaker.
Opera GX & GXC on HelpdeskOur Helpdesk section containing all Opera GX/GXC related guides.

Here are some community tutorials to help you on your way:

 Game Maker Station's GMS2 Tutorials Playlist Community tutorials from GameMakerStation, there's something for everyone!
 Shaun Spalding's YouTube channel Community tutorials from Shaun Spalding, a lot of useful content!
 Slyddar's YouTube Tutorials Community tutorials from Slyddar, great GML + DnD content!

Read the GXC section on our Helpdesk to find help articles and tutorials that will help you make the best game you can, and use the GameMaker Community forums to ask for help whenever you feel stuck.

Happy GameMaking!


Written by Gurpreet S. Matharoo

Technical Writer at GameMaker, Gurpreet creates documentation and tutorials, to make game dev easier for you. He loves using the computer to bring new things to life, whether it's games, digital art, or Metal music.